Posts Tagged ‘terrorism’

* a person, usually a member of a group, who uses or advocates terrorism.

* a person who terrorizes or frightens others.

* a radical who employs terror as a political weapon; usually organizes with other terrorists in small cells; often uses religion as a cover for terrorist activities

We call Osama Bin Laden a terrorist. We consider him responsible for those who act as his advocates. He doesn’t move about Iran or Iraq or Pakistan informing and instructing people in how to act, he merely inspires those around him to shout “Death to Infidels” and “Kill Americans!” and to set off car bombs in a campaign intended to undermine the efforts of others to maintain order.

We’ve seen less blatant but equally effective terrorism in the past. We’ve seen leaders use fear and terrorism as a political weapon. Despots and dictators, certainly, and those who hide behind the skirts of religion and power to engage in acts of violence, censorship and ethnic cleansing.

Currently we have a pair of terrorist operatives in this country inciting their small cells, their “base,” into a frothy fury of fear and hatred. They speak of the evils of other Americans and, like Bin Laden, are willing to let the individuals carry out their message. They even go around the country calling themselves radicals. And when their followers shout out words like “traitor!” and spit out “off with his head” at their rallies then there is no doubt who the real terrorists are.

John McCain and Sarah Palin are no less terrorists than Osama Bin Laden.

The campaign has gone beyond any previous level of partisan anything-to-get-elected tactics and has moved into the realm of the truly evil. To those who have never understood how a thing like Nazi Germany came about — remember, Hitler was elected Chancellor in a democratic election — I only need to point to the current phase of the McCain campaign as a living reminder. This isn’t a question of ideological differences, this is a campaign of terrorism, plain and simple, based on fear, anger and hatred.

No matter who wins the election, if anything happens to Barak Obama or his family — or any innocent American for that matter — as a result of the current campaign rhetoric I will personally hold John McCain and Sarah Palin responsible for the rest of their natural lives. They have done nothing to quell the rabble, to talk the villagers from gathering with their pitchforks and torches of hatred, and in doing so encourage those they consider their supporters, their base, to act on their behalf. These are the people McCain calls “my friends” and who Palin identifies with as “plain folks.” If they want to play a game of guilt by association by tying Obama to a former domestic terrorist like William Ayers then they better ready themselves for the inevitable. The first person who carries out an act of violence or terrorism on behalf of McCain or Palin, that blood will be entirely theirs.

Just like we do with Bin Laden.

We are standing at the brink of history. There is an opportunity for that history to fall to either side. We will either move forward or tumble backward. There are terrorists among us.


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So I’m looking at the footage of the protest on the Golden Gate Bridge yesterday.  You know, the “Free Tibet” banners that were hung from the bridge?  Nice to see a bit of the old home, remember just how politically active the Bay Area is compared to the rest of this great nation.

But… wait.  Isn’t the Golden Gate Bridge one of the high priority targets for protection by Homeland Security?  If a group of protesters can mount these banners on the bridge with this sort of ease, what does it say about our ability to protect the bridge from terrorism and sabotage?

It’s just as I have always believed: terrorism in this country is built on fear, a fear perpetrated by our own government for its own political ends.  We’re not any “safer” than we were before 9-11, just as we’re in no greater danger than before.  The fear and terror are created within and come from the top down.  If we were serious about securing the homeland (which always sounds a little too close to the Fatherland for my taste) then things like this protest on one of the most visibly public American structures couldn’t have happened with such ease.

Americans should be afraid.  Of their own government.  The founding fathers said so.

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